Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake

gluten free chocolate almond quinoa cake recipe

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake.  No flour.  100% gluten free.  And quite possibly THE best chocolate cake you’ve ever had!  Trust me on this.

“Nuh-uh” you say.  Take another look, a little closer up.

No flour.  Just quinoa and almonds.  And for those of you who are skeptical about the quinoa, you will not be able to taste it.  Guaranteed.  You’ll simply think it’s about the richest, most flavorful, and delicious chocolate cake you’ve ever had.

Have you ever seen anything quite so moist and delectable?  Look at that tender, moist, decadent crumb!  Imagine sinking your teeth into that…Ohhhhhh, yeaaaaaaaah….

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake 1 closeup

This recipe comes by way of request from Elizabeth Ray (Make a Request!).  She wrote:  “Quinoa Chocolate Cake. I was at a cafe in Wasagaming, just outside Riding Mountain National Park. We had this cake for desert. It was very, very good! Moist, but not overly so, and not so sweet that you NEEDED coffee to help you finish it. You might still want it of course. It had a thin layer of icing, almost a glaze, but not quite. but the cake itself was remarkable, held together nicely without being mushy. It was one layer only, but we didn’t mind. It was enough, but not too much. This is starting to sound a lot like the three bears story, isn’t it?”  I was tickled by this charming description as well as excited by the idea of a chocolate quinoa cake.  I had already developed a cake using quinoa earlier this Summer (Honey Olive Quinoa Cake) and have two more baked goods recipes using quinoa that I’m getting ready to unveil in the near future, so I’ve been pretty into quinoa lately as it is.  So this request was well-timed.  It also helped that it came at the heel of a three day holiday weekend so I had some time to tackle it.

Unlike my Honey Olive Quinoa Cake which is moist but hearty and “cake-like”, the description of this cake brought to mind a very different image.  As I visualized the final outcome, what actually came to mind was something along the lines of Julia Child’s fabulous Reine de Saba, chocolate almond, cake.  I wanted a cake that was incredibly rich and moist but also delicate.  I wanted a cake that wasn’t overly sweet but with full depth of flavor.  And then there was the description of an almost glaze-like icing.  So I got to work.

In order to achieve the smooth texture and moistness I was after, I knew the quinoa would need to be pureed.  I remembered reading about this idea from a recipe in the book “Quinoa 365″ and I’ve borrowed a couple of steps from it for my cake recipe.

While Elizabeth’s request didn’t include almond, I love the combination of chocolate and almonds.  It just makes the chocolate flavor that much better.  And it adds an element of elegance.  The ground almonds add texture and airness to the cake as do the beaten egg whites, providing more “lift”.

I was absolutely floored by the end result.  And I mean f.l.o.o.r.e.d.!  The texture and flavor is out-of-this-world good!  Gluten free Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake.  Elizabeth Ray, I want to reach through this computer screen to wherever you are and give you a big hug!  Thank you for putting in your request and giving me the challenge and opportunity to develop a cake that is now a family favorite!

And yes, I think even Goldilocks would approve.

Todd loves this cake.  And he has never liked cake before (he’s a pie man).  Not until he married me anyway :)  He likes my cakes,  but he especially loves this cake!  He said, “I think this is probably the best cake I’ve ever had.”

Todd sampling.  Look at that luscious pair of lips cake.  Mmmmmmm.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake 3

Our precious baby Emily loves this cake, too!  She had a big smile with every bite.  I had a smile, too, knowing each bite was packed full of quinoa!

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake 5

I tried offering our son, Liam, some cake.  His response:

Liam 136

You learn not to take anything food-related personally – not with a 3 year old.  Plus, how can anything hope to compete with the interest of a flower pot that can both serve as a helmet and toilet?  Ah, the simple pleasures of life!

Liam 137

This cake is truly amazing.  Trust me.  MAKE IT!!  Make it NOW!

Here’s how:

Grease a 9×2 or 9×3 inch round cake pan.  I use and love Parrish Magic Line.  Made in the USA, hand-forged aluminum.

Note:  If you tend to have bad luck with cakes sticking to the pan, you can also use parchment paper. Cut a circle out of parchment paper to snugly line the bottom of the cake pan, then our the batter over it.

Cook the quinoa while you’re preparing the other ingredients.  To cook the quinoa, thoroughly rinse about 1/3 cup of quinoa in a fine mesh sieve (this removes the saponin, a natural coating on quinoa’s outer layer that is bitter and soapy tasting).  Place the quinoa in a small saucepan with double the amount of water, bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.  Remove from the heat and let sit another 5 minutes, still covered.  Fluff with a fork.

How to cook quinoa

You’ll need 3/4 cup whole almonds.  Grinding them from whole will impart much more flavor than buying them already ground where they’ve been sitting in a plastic bag for who knows how long.  So grind some almonds to a powder using a coffee/spice grinder or food processor.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 1

3/4 cup whole almonds = 1 cup ground

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 2

Combine the sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a mixing bowl.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 3

Add the unsweetened cocoa powder and stir to combine.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 5

Add the ground almonds and stir to combine.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 9 Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 10

Separate the egg whites and yolks.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 6

Melt the butter, let it cool.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 4

Combine the quinoa, egg yolks, milk, butter, coconut oil, vanilla extract, and almond extract in a powerful blend and blend until smooth.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 8

The result will be a thick, pale paste.  Place the quinoa batter in a large mixing bowl.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 11

Add the sugar mixture and use a rubber spatula or wooden spoon to combine.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 12   Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 14

Beat the egg whites on high speed until foamy, add the cream of tartar, and continue to beat until the egg whites are satiny and stiff peaks form.  Be careful not to over-beat.

How to beat egg whites

These are what stiff peaks look like.  When you lift the beaters out of the mixture the peaks will stand up and curl over at the tip, but remain firm.

How to beat egg whites

Using a rubber spatula, carefully fold in the egg whites, half at a time.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 15

We want the egg whites to provide some “lift” and airiness to the cake.  Don’t over-stir, just fold them in and white swirls will remain in the batter.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 16

Pour the batter into a 9×2 inch greased cake pan.  I use Magic Line cake pans and LOVE them!  Made in the USA with hand-forged aluminum.  I have a 9×3 inch pan because it’s more versatile – it can accommodate higher cakes.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 17

Bake in an oven preheated to 350 degrees F for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean.  Allow the cake to cool in the cake pan for 10 minutes before removing.  Use a butter knife to carefully push the edges slightly towards the center to gently loosen the bottom of the cake.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 18

Very carefully invert the cake onto a plate and then invert it back onto a cake platter, top side up.  The cake will be slightly sunken in the middle as it cools, don’t worry, that’s to be expected for this cake.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 19

To prepare the Chocolate Almond Glaze, combine all the glaze ingredients in a small bowl and stir to combine.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 21 Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 22

Pour the glaze around the top of the cake, and around the top edges so the glaze oozes down the sides.  Use a knife to guide the glaze and spread it evenly over the cake.  You’ll need to work fairly fast as the glaze dries quickly.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 23

Sprinkle with slivered or sliced almonds according to your decorative preferences.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 24

Clean up the glaze blotches on the plate with a wet paper towel or cloth.  You don’t want to transfer the cake again to a clean plate – it likely won’t be able to withstand another move without falling apart.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 25 Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 26

This cake cuts beautifully.

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 27

Let’s coax that luscious slice of cake out of its chocolate sphere…

  Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 29

Gorgeous.

  Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake prep 31

Enjoy!  (You will, I promise.)

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake 1

 

Chocolate Almond Quinoa Cake (GF)
 
:
Serves: 6
Ingredients
  • 2 cups cooked quinoa, loosely packed
  • 4 egg yolks
  • ⅓ cup milk
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
  • ½ cup butter, melted
  • ¼ cup coconut oil
  • 1½ cups granulated white sugar
  • ¾ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1½ teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 4 egg whites
  • ½ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 cup ground almonds
  • For Chocolate Almond Glaze:
  • 4 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 cup powdered sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ teaspoon almond extract
  • 2 tablespoons hot water
  • Slivered almonds for decoration
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Butter a 9x2 inch round cake pan. (*see note)
  2. Place the cooked quinoa in a blender along with the milk, egg yolks, vanilla extract, almond extract, butter and coconut oil. Blend until smooth.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the sugar, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Using a rubber spatula, stir the quinoa mixture into the sugar mixture until combined. Stir in the ground almonds.
  4. In a small mixing bowl, beat the egg whites on high speed until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and continue to beat until stiff peaks form.
  5. Using the rubber spatula, gently fold the egg whites into the cake batter.
  6. Pour the batter into the cake pan and bake on the middle rack of the oven for 45-50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean but moist.
  7. Let the cake sit in the pan for 10 minutes before carefully inverting it onto a plate and then carefully inverting it again (top side up) onto a cake platter to cool completely.
  8. To make the Chocolate Almond Glaze: Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Pour over the completely cooled cake, spread evenly over top and sides of cake. Immediately sprinkle with the slivered almonds. Allow the glaze to dry before serving.
Notes
* If you tend to have bad luck with cakes sticking to the pan, you can also use parchment paper. Cut a circle out of parchment paper to snugly line the bottom of the cake pan, then our the batter over it.

 

70 Responses

  1. Anna

    wrote on

    Your babies are Beautiful !! You are blessed.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thank you, Anna. I really truly am.

  2. jesusan

    wrote on

    This cake looks wonderful – it’s enough to make me think it’s wrong to pay attention to my weight, my calorie and carb intake. I wish it weren’t off the map for me… I’m certain I would enjoy it. :-)

  3. wrote on

    I’ve been seeing quinoa cake on a couple of blogs lately and now I’m definitely intrigued! Your pictures are making me want to make this ASAP!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Taylor! It’s seriously one of the best cakes I’ve ever had! I feel slightly bad tooting my own horn this much, but it truly is fantastic! My kitchen muse was very good to me :)

  4. Anonymous

    wrote on

    It. Is. Gorgeous!!!!
    And am sure it is equally delicious!
    Loved your post!!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thank you!! :) I hope you’ll give it a try and let me know what you think!

  5. wrote on

    Hi there, just popped over to let you know that your link to Food on Friday: Cakes was featured in my Need Some Inspiration? Series on Carole’s Chatter today. Cheers

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Carole, that’s wonderful news! Thanks so much! :)

  6. Tori

    wrote on

    The cake looks delish!! And the kids are adorable. . . Love the picture of little Emily <3

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Tori :)

  7. wrote on

    Wow! I can’t believe it’s quinoa. Looks delicious. I see you’re going to IFBC – hope to meet you there :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Kristin! Thank you! Yes, I’ll be there and likewise :)

  8. charlotte

    wrote on

    “And for those of you who are skeptical about the quinoa, you will not be able to taste it.” Since quinoa has about as much taste as wheat, you CAN taste it, in as much as one tastes wheat in any recipe. Do not fear quinoa, beans, chickpeas, etc in ANY recipe, they are all seeds, just like a grain of wheat.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Charlotte, yes, that’s true. But some people are squeamish about flavors they aren’t used. Quinoa definitely has a different flavor than wheat and if it’s a flavor one isn’t used to, it can be received as unpleasant. I know several people who say they dislike the flavor of quinoa and so avoid it, but the quinoa flavor is completely camouflaged in this cake. I love grains and beans of all kinds and love incorporating them into my cooking. Just recently made a Pakistani “fudge” made of chickpea flour that is to die for!

      • charlotte

        wrote on

        That fudge looks divine!

        • The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          Welcome back, Charlotte! I agree! :)

  9. wrote on

    This chocolate cake looks so delicious! I never used Quinoa for a cake but I definitely will try this out!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, bakeaffairs! I don’t think I’ve ever been quite so giddy about the end result of a baking experiment. It came pretty darn close with my experimental Mega Healthy Honey Olive Quinoa Cake (which is a much healthier cake), but I’m particularly giddy about this one :) Would love to hear your feedback once you’ve had the chance to try it!

  10. Tayrea

    wrote on

    Looks delicious! I just want to clarify something to make sure I get the right amount of quinoa. In the beginning it says to rinse 1/3 of a cup then cook it, but in the recipe it says 2 cups. Does the 1/3 measure 2 cups when it is cooked? Thanks :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Tayrea, thank you! Yes, that’s correct. You’ll need just a tad over 1/3 cup uncooked quinoa to equal 2 cups cooked.

      • Diana

        wrote on

        Hi!

        Thanks for the recipe,I made it yesterday and it tastes fantastic!

        However, it seems to me that 1/3 cup raw quinoa equals 1 cup cooked quinoa, not 2… Could this be a different type? (I’ve used red). Or did you cook it particularly long?

        Also 3/4 cups whole almonds don’t make 1 cup ground for me… Possibly the other way round?

        Thanks!

        I’m looking forward to trying your quinoa-olive oil cake as well.

        • The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          Hi Diana! Wonderful, I’m so happy you enjoyed it! Well, typically you’ll find instructions that say 1/2 cup raw quinoa equals 2 cups cooked. For this recipe I say “about 1/3″ cup because once it’s simmered for 15 minutes and left to sit for 5, it’s then fluffed with a fork – so when it’s then measured out, it’s not packed. You’ll have 2 cups of “fluffed”, loosely packed quinoa. But I think that yes, the measuring issue here does lie in the type of quinoa you used. Red quinoa doesn’t fluff up as much as white. Red quinoa holds its shape better that white, and remains more firm (which, on a side note, is why it’s usually the quinoa of choice for things like salads). As for the ground almonds, 3/4 whole has always yielded 1 cup ground for me. Generally when you grind things they “expand.” For example, the consensus is that if you grind a cup of wheat berries you end up with 1 1/2 cups ground. Same principle with grinding whole spices. Freshly ground almonds are pretty “fluffy” and again, this isn’t a firmly packed 1 cup.

          I’m excited to have you try the Honey Olive Quinoa Cake! It’s a completely different kind of cake. This “mega healthy” cake is dense and not as sweet, but I love it!

          • Diana

            wrote on

            Thank you for the explanation. I’ll certainly let you know how the Honey Olive Quinoa Cake turns out when I make it.

  11. Adina

    wrote on

    Hallo,
    I just discovered your blog a couple of days ago, you must be my culinary soul mate. :) You make exactly the kind of recipes I make.
    I tried this cake today, it was PERFECTION. And I am really not a chocolate cake or anything chocolate fan. I made it for some friends who came to visit and I ended up eating 3 slices myself. The whole cake was gone in about half an hour.
    Thank you so much

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Adina, I’m thrilled to hear that! And I’m especially happy to have a culinary soul mate! :) I know, I had a really hard time resisting eating this whole cake myself! It’s a good thing I had several other eager mouths around or I would have been in trouble. Thank you so much for your kind words, Adina, for making this cake, and for your generous feedback. I look forward to more feedback as you try more recipes!

  12. Adina

    wrote on

    Oh, and I forgot to mention: I only used 1 cup sugar for the cake and half a cup for the glaze. :)

    • Diana

      wrote on

      So did I! I always tend to halve sugar in recipes, I kept a bit more here because of the abundance of cocoa. I usually make the full-sugar version for guests and the reduced-sugar one for home. I think raspberry sauce would also work well with this cake (if one manages to cut it in half), I’ll try it next time!

  13. Helen

    wrote on

    Thank you so much for this recipe! Since being diagnosed as wheat intolerant, baking has been a challenge to say the least, but this cake was fantastic – easy to make, super chocolatey – and not just ‘for a wheat-free cake’ – my wheat eating friends snarfled it up as quickly as me! :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Helen! I know!! It honestly exceeded my expectations. I was nervous, unsure if the combination of pureed quinoa, ground almonds, and folded in beaten egg whites would all come together properly, but the end result was miraculous and this is a cake I’ll return to again and again! Thanks so much for your feedback! :)

  14. Andre

    wrote on

    Can we replace the egg with anything to make it vegan?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Andre! I really don’t know much about vegan egg substitutions. I just googled it and one suggestion is to use agar agar with lukewarm water to form a gelatin-like substance to stir into the cake batter. I really don’t know how effective that is, and you’d need to figure out what the equivalent of it is for the eggs called for in the cake. Good luck!

  15. Blossom

    wrote on

    I made this for treat day at work recently and everyone was amazed that it was gluten-free and healthier than the average chocolate indulgence! My colleagues were very impressed by the decadence of this cake. It’s perfect for a chocolate craving (even a few days after it was made). Thank you for this recipe!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi, Blossom! That’s wonderful to hear! I just made it again last week and, no kidding, “mmmmmm’s” followed almost every bite :) I LOVE this cake – so glad you did, too!

  16. aleisha

    wrote on

    My kids arw allergy to eggs so is there any other thing i can replace with?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Aleisha! I don’t know of any substitutes that would work adequately. I’m not sure if egg substitute would work or not – probably not, but you could certainly try it. If it does work or if you find another substitute that works, be sure to let us know!

  17. Agnes

    wrote on

    Hi Kim,
    Found your website searching for mango chutney- I made it , soo delicious! Then this cake! Wow! I managed to wow 3 more people with it + me :-). Had to cut the sugar in half; still delicious!
    BTW: I am Hungarian it was delightful to read your adventures in Hungary + kudos to your brother learning the language :-) within a short amount of time.
    Made the gomba porkolt the other day, and getting to the gulyas soon.
    Now I wonder if you ever tried to make the turo gomboc, hortobagyi palacsinta or varga beles?
    Ya, the Turo Rudi – I am not a die hard chocolate lover- but I totally get it why people love the Turo Rudi. Hehe:-).

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello, Agnes, and welcome! I’m so happy you found my site and am really thrilled to hear that you’ve enjoyed all of the dishes you’ve tried so far! My goodness, you have my mouth watering from the list of Hungarian dishes you mentioned :) I had completely forgotten about turo gomboc – thank you for reminding me! It’s been added to my “to make” list. And I love, love, love hortobagyi palacsinta! I’ve eaten it in Hungary but have not yet made it myself – it’s now been moved up further on my “to make” list. :) The last one, varga beles, I have heard of but have never tried. It looks like another lovely comfort food dish. If you have any other recommendations, I’d love to have them. Best, Kimberly

  18. AmsMom

    wrote on

    Made this cake to bring to Thanksgiving dinner. I had to throw it away. Tasted horrible. Stuck to the pan even after buttering. Please don’t waste your time or money on this terrible recipe.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello! I am so sorry to hear this recipe didn’t work out for you! I’ve made it four times myself and have gotten literally dozens of emails from readers who have made and loved it. I’m not really sure what could have gone so wrong for you from both a flavor and texture standpoint, but I’d be happy to try and troubleshoot it with you if you’re interested.

  19. jennifer

    wrote on

    Even with buttering the pan, mine stuck. I thought it was still delicious though! My husband didn’t love how strong the almond flavoring was. Any chance it could be done without the ground almonds? or what about using pecans??

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Jennifer! What kind of pan did you use? I use non-coated aluminum, which is considered by many to be the best for baking. I actually have less problems with sticking than I do when I use a non-stick pan (that goes for almost everything I bake). With cakes like these, and other flourless cakes that are more finicky, quality bakeware is especially essential. The almond flavor – the strong flavor is coming mostly from the almond extract, so that’s what I would cut back on, not eliminate the ground almonds. You can leave the extract in the cake and eliminate it altogether in the glaze, for example. As for nut substitutions – sure, you can use any nut you like. Hazelnuts pair really well with chocolate, too. But if your reason for substituting nuts is to cut back on the almond flavor, then just cutting back on the almond extract will do the trick.

      For anyone else who has made this cake with success, what kind of pan did you use?

      • jennifer

        wrote on

        Thank you for the prompt response! I actually used a non-coated aluminum pan. Maybe it was too small. I’m not sure of the size…it may have been 8×8. We are in the process of moving and could only find that one at the time. Hazelnuts sound delicious!!! Maybe I will try that!

        • The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          No, I don’t think size would affect that. Some other things to watch for to ensure a clean release from the pan: Make sure you allow the cake to cool before inverting it. Make sure the creases along the bottom of the pan are thoroughly coated in butter, too otherwise the cake will stick. Make sure the cake is done – toothpick test. If it’s too moist it won’t release properly. Elevation can impact baking time, so adjust accordingly. Scuffs or scratches in the baking pan can also cause the cake to stick. Lastly, consider using parchment paper. Some people use it religiously, others never use it. I never use it. But if you tend to have bad luck with cakes sticking, then use parchment paper – cut a circle out to snugly fit in the bottom of the cake pan and pour the batter over it.

          • jennifer

            wrote on

            Made it again, this one was an even bigger disaster!! :( I’ve never had such bad luck with baking before. Oh well.

          • The Daring Gourmet

            wrote on

            Well, I definitely admire your determination! I’m sorry your efforts resulted in another failure. I can imagine how terribly frustrating that is. I wish I could have observed in order to see what what going on and make the appropriate suggestions. If I’m remembering correctly, you said the first time you made it both the texture and the flavor were horrible. There are many factors that could be impacting the texture (oven temperature and geographic elevation, baking time, adequate greasing of the pan, the quality and condition of the pan itself – i.e., scratches and dings – proper cooling before inverting the cake, the inverting process itself, etc). Flourless cakes in particular can be a little challenging to work with. I rarely use parchment paper to line the bottom of my pans, but it’s something I recommend to people who have bad luck with cakes sticking. But texture aside, if you don’t like the flavor of the cake to begin with, then that’s another matter. I’m assuming you thoroughly rinsed the quinoa (very important otherwise the cake will taste bitter) and are using fresh quinoa and almonds and a good almond extract, in which case I’d have to conclude that you don’t like the flavor of either the quinoa, almonds or chocolate since that’s pretty much all that’s in the cake and there wouldn’t be any other adverse flavors in it. In any case, thank you for giving it a shot – twice. I feel badly that this cake failed for you when so many others have fallen in love with it – it’s such a wonderful cake. But I hope you’ll try, and enjoy, some of my other recipes. Best, Kimberly

          • jennifer

            wrote on

            Actually, they both tasted great! This time, instead of almonds, I used hazelnuts and I cut the amount of almond extract in half. It stuck the first time, so this time I used parchment paper, that worked great! This time it completely collapsed in the middle. I wonder if it was due to the hazelnuts. They seemed much more oily when I ground them than the almonds. I think I’m determined to get it to work. We’ll see!!

          • The Daring Gourmet

            wrote on

            Hi Jennifer! Yes, I did get you confused with someone else who couldn’t stand the flavor. No, I don’t think it would have collapsed because of the hazelnuts. If you Google “reasons why cakes collapse” you’ll see several links that cite multiple reasons. Oh, I’m so sorry this has been so frustrating for you! On a (hopefully) more positive note, have you tried any of my other recipes yet?

  20. Amy

    wrote on

    I cant find quinoa where I live :( … what can i substitute for it in this recipe?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Amy! There is no substitute for quinoa in this recipe I’m afraid. Is it an option to order the quinoa online?

  21. Rebecca

    wrote on

    made this many times and recently used hazelnut meal instead of almond meal and it was very special :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s fantastic, Rebecca!! This has become one of my very favorites, too, and I’ve done the same thing in substituting hazelnuts – the chocolate hazelnut combo is another winner! (Which accounts for the sweeping popularity of Nutella). Thanks so much for your feedback! Best, Kimberly

  22. Susan

    wrote on

    I made this a few days ago. It was delicious and beautiful. I enjoyed being able to share it with my “gluten-free” friends. Thanks!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’m so happy to hear you made this, Susan! We LOVE this cake! It’s seriously become one of my favorite chocolate cakes ever. So thrilled you enjoyed it!

  23. Taryn Peters

    wrote on

    a friend shared your 2 quinoa cake recipes with me, and Im SO glad she did! What a hit! The chocolate one did sink quite drastically when I took it out the oven, but thankfully I was using it to make a construction themed cake for my son’s birthday so no-one even knew! ha ha. Going to make it for the weekend, just because ;)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Taryn, and welcome! That’s wonderful, I’m so happy you enjoyed them and thanks for the feedback! If it sunk in the middle it wasn’t quite done or the oven was opened too early during the baking process. I just had a cake sink last week because I did the toothpick test on the side of the cake (where it was done) instead of the center (where it wasn’t). That definitely was a reminder to make sure I always test it in the very center. So happy to have you on board and hope you’ll be a frequent visitor! Best, Kimberly

  24. Fia

    wrote on

    Hi I did the cake exactly as you said. It came out perfect. So moist and chocolaty. But instead of a round mould, I used like the bunt cake mould and I let it in the oven for 5 more minutes after the baking time. Guess what, it did not sink. It stay nice and firm. In any case, thank you for the recipe.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s fantastic, Fia! I’m happy it turned out so well. I’ll bet it looked beautiful in the bundt mould – I’ll need to give that a try next time. Thanks so much for your feedback!

      • fia

        wrote on

        Hi again,

        I came across a piece of information and i thought it might be useful to you. i read a tip given by a chef about baking and he said, to never beat the egg whites till peak are firm as this will cause the cake to sink while cooling but instead to beat the whites until it is very fluffy and on the point of making peaks.
        Hope it helps. Btw i am planning on trying more of your recipes and also to make a quinoa coffee walnut cake based on the chocolate almond cake.
        Also, nice pictures and lovely family. cherish it!

        Regards,
        Fia

        • The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          Hi Fia! That’s interesting, I’ve never heard that before. The standard for baking cakes using beaten egg whites is to beat them until they’re stiff/firm, but not dry. This gives the cake “lift” and provides a nicely textured crumb. Julia Child emphasized the importance of this technique for baking certain kinds of cakes. That said, even though neglecting to beat the egg whites until they’re stiff will “hurt” the body and texture of the cake, perhaps that chef is correct in that it can help prevent sinking. I would first troubleshoot all the other reasons for why the cake is sinking though, because there are a lot of factors that can cause that. That’s an interesting tip though and thank you for sharing!

  25. Angelo, Leslie and Adam

    wrote on

    I tried this recipe a couple weeks ago. It was AMAZING! Thank you!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’m so thrilled to hear that, Angelo, Leslie & Adam! I love this cake as well and plan on doing some experimenting with different variations of it, but it’s going to be hard to top this one. Thanks for your feedback, I appreciate it!

  26. Tiffany

    wrote on

    I’m going to bake this tonight and put a coconut layer on top before I glaze it. I’m trying to make a quinoa version of an almond joy cake. Fingers crossed!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s a great idea, Tiffany, and it should work out beautifully! It sounds like you’re going to put the coconut layer on after it’s baked, which is good otherwise it would be next to impossible to remove the cake from the pan. But if you were to bake the coconut layer, a cheesecake-type of pan with a removable bottom would work perfectly. You’ve got me craving a slice right now! Let us know how it turns out!

  27. Emma Monteith

    wrote on

    It looks so good, I am about to make your cake.. I’m in the UK and just wondered whether it is USA ‘cups’ size or Australian ‘cups’ size?
    Thanks in advance!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Emma, these are USA measurements. Happy baking!

Trackbacks

Leave a Reply