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Gomen (Ethiopian Collard Greens)

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This authentic Ethiopian side dish known as Gomen takes eating healthy greens to a whole new level of deliciousness!  A quick, simple, healthy, and thoroughly yummy side dish!

gomen recipe ethiopian collard greens traditional authentic

If you’re looking for an authentic Ethiopian veggie side dish to serve with your Ethiopian entree, Gomen (aka Ye’abesha Gomen) is among the most popular and delicious.

Or if you’re simply looking for a wonderfully flavorful way to enjoy those healthy greens, look no further.

gomen recipe ethiopian collard greens authentic

Gomen is traditionally made with collard greens but kale works equally well.  You can also use spinach but I prefer the crispiness of the collards or kale.

This traditional Ethiopian side dish can be found in most Ethiopian restaurants and pairs wonderfully with any number of Ethiopian meat and vegetarian dishes including doro wat, sega wat and misir wat, to name a few.

ethiopian food

Above picture:  The gomen is in the top left corner of the platter to the left of the lettuce.  A variety of Ethiopian dishes are commonly served for a meal and instead of serving them on a plate are served on injera, Ethiopian flatbread.  Additional injera is served on the side and pieces are torn off and used as utensils to scoop up the food.

To make Ethiopian Gomen you need an ingredient called niter kibbeh, which is an Ethiopian spiced clarified butter.  It is made using the same method as Indian ghee in which the butter is heated and the butterfat is separated from the milk solids.  Niter kibbeh is infused with a variety of fragrant herbs and spices resulting in a clarified butter that is highly aromatic and flavorful.  Niter kibbeh is an essential ingredient in Ethiopian cuisine, including Gomen, and there are no adequate substitutes.

Niter kibbeh is extremely easy to make and keeps for several months in the fridge.  While you can buy niter kibbeh online, nothing compares to the flavor and fragrance of homemade.  Check out our recipe for Authentic Niter Kibbeh (Ethiopian Spiced Clarified Butter).

niter kibbeh ethiopian spiced clarified butter recipe

Okay, let’s make some Gomen!

gomen recipe ethiopian collard greens authentic

Gomen Recipe

Let’s get started!

Heat the niter kibbeh in a pan over medium high heat.  Add the onions and cook until soft and translucent, 5-7 minutes.

cooking onions

Add the garlic, ginger and spices and cook for another 2-3 minutes.

Add the collard greens and another tablespoon of niter kibbeh and cook until the collards turn bright green and are wilted but still slightly crispy, 5-7 minutes.  Add more spices and/or niter kibbeh to taste.

adding seasonings and collards

This is a highly versatile side dish and pairs with virtually any Ethiopian entree.

gomen ethiopian collard greens recipe authentic

Enjoy!

gomen recipe ethiopian collard greens authentic

For more delicious Ethiopian recipes be sure to try our:

Gomen (Ethiopian Collard Greens)

This authentic Ethiopian side dish takes eating healthy greens to a whole new level of deliciousness!
4.96 from 22 votes
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Course Side Dish
Cuisine ethiopian
Servings 4 servings
Calories 115 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 3 tablespoons niter kibbeh (plus an extra tablespoon for later)
  • 1 large yellow onion , halved and thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic , minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons finely minced fresh ginger
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 bunch collard greens (about 12 ounces) , washed, thick stems removed, roughly chopped (can also use kale)

Instructions
 

  • Heat niter kibbeh in a pan over medium high heat.  Add the onion and cook until soft and translucent, 5-7 minutes.  Add the garlic, ginger and spices and cook for 2-3 minutes.  Add the collard greens and another tablespoon of niter kibbeh and cook until the collards turn bright green and are wilted but still a slightly crispy, 5-7 minutes.  Add more spices and/or niter kibbeh to taste.

Nutrition

Calories: 115kcalCarbohydrates: 3gFat: 11gSaturated Fat: 6gCholesterol: 28mgSodium: 293mgPotassium: 49mgSugar: 1gVitamin A: 125IUVitamin C: 3.4mgCalcium: 20mgIron: 0.4mg
Keyword Gomen
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
kimberly killebrew the daring gourmet

Hi, I’m Kimberly Killebrew and welcome to Daring Gourmet where you'll find delicious originals, revitalized classics, and simply downright good eats from around the world! Originally from Germany, later raised in England, world-traveled, and now living in the U.S., from my globally-influenced kitchen I invite you to tour the world through your taste buds!

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Recipe Rating




4.96 from 22 votes (10 ratings without comment)

38 Comments

  1. This was really delicious. I think the niter kibbeh really takes this over the top. We used some organic collards that we’d grown last summer, blanched and frozen. They worked well in your recipe. We eat plant based so made our niter kibbeh with plant based butter. It was terrific. Thank you so much. We will be growing extra collards this summer!

  2. really yummy. I had”Ethiopian night” with my family. Made 3 of your recipies. Lots of chopping, dicing, cooking and cleaning of dishes, but oh my-delicious! Thank you!

  3. Thank you for posting this! I think I requested it a few weeks ago. Making Doro Wat tonight so will make Gomen to go with it. You are fantastic!!

  4. Hey Kimberly,

    Do you reckon I can use two teaspoons of berbere instead?

    Its just I have loaaads of berbere left from when I made your delicious misir wat recipe, so would like to use that instead!

    Thanks

    Nina

    1. Thanks for the suggestion to use berbere. I also had some extra from the doro wat I made, and I didn’t have the other spices in the recipe. I came out great. Thanks for a delicious recipe, Kimberly!

  5. Are you able to tell me exactly what Collard means, in this context, please? It is a word that I have been unable to get a handle on for many years!

    1. Where the term “collard” comes from I don’t know but they’re in the cabbage family. They’re large loose leaves, similar to kale.

      1. Yes, collards have often larger leaves if you compare them to kale at a market’s produce section. The best time to buy collard greens is in the cool season. It’s at this time of year that collards and other greens are at their sweetest. If still in doubt, the produce personnel can guide you to what you’re looking for. Should you find kale enjoyable, try growing your own for amazing freshness and flavor.

        1. Hi Linda, definitely, we grow our own greens every year (kale, collards, Swiss chard, spinach, etc) and the flavor and nutrition are vastly superior.

  6. Kimberly, I’m so excited you posted this! This is my absolute favorite Ethiopian dish, hands down! I also love the cabbage dish (I forget the name). I’ll be trying this one this week. All of your recipes I’ve cooked have turned out fabulous and I’m sure this will be no exception. I thank you and my family thanks you :)