Hungarian Mushroom Soup

Mushroom Soup

I love Hungary.  Such a beautiful country with wonderful people and delicious food.  Budapest is an amazing city.  That stunning bridge crossing the Danube, the Fisherman’s Warf, the markets, the classic Viennese-influenced architecture…  I think it’s one of the most beautiful cities in Eastern Europe, if not the most.  Most people seem to emphasize Prague and it is a tourist hot spot in Eastern Europe.   But while Prague is a gorgeous city, I prefer Budapest hands down.

We’re definitely going to get to more Hungarian cuisine in the future, but for now let me introduce you to something I just made that was absolutely delicious!  A heavily Hungarian-influenced mushroom soup.

This soup is positively delightful!  Onions and cremini mushrooms are caramelized in butter.  A separate rich roux is made with butter and flour (this adds a world of depth and flavor to the soup).  A heap of paprika is then thrown in along with the delicate flavor of dill and a variety of other ingredients that combine to make this a guaranteed hit at your dinner table!

This is a stunningly rich and satisfying soup.  And it’s also incredibly delicious as a creamy sauce over egg noodles.  Try it both ways!  Either way, it’s a winner.

Try this delicious variation:  Hungarian Mushroom Pasta

Hungarian Mushroom Pasta 2 sm

Now let’s get to that Hungarian Mushroom Soup Recipe!

Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 1Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 2Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 4Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 5Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 6Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 7Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 3Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 8Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 9Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 10Hungarian Mushroom Pasta prep 11

Hungarian Mushroom Soup
 
:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons butter (vegan substitute: vegetable spread, like Earth Balance)
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 12 oz mushrooms (cremini or white button mushrooms, chopped)
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 4 teaspoons fresh dill, chopped or 2 teaspoons dried dill
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoons black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons butter (vegan substitute: vegetable spread, like Earth Balance)
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup milk (vegan: use soy or hemp milk)
  • 2 cups beef broth (vegan: use vegetable broth)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • ½ cup sour cream (vegan: use vegan sour cream)
  • Parsley, chopped, for garnish
  • Extra sour cream, for garnish
Instructions
  1. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in small pan. Saute the onions until translucent and just barely beginning to brown. Add the garlic and saute for another minute. Add the mushrooms and sauté for 5 minutes until the mushrooms release their juices. Add the paprika, dill, salt and pepper. Set aside.
  2. In a Dutch oven, melt 3 tablespoons of butter and stir in the flour, constantly whisking for several minutes until the mixture is a rich, caramelized brown. Add the milk, broth, and soy sauce, still whisking until the mixture is smooth. Add the mushroom mixture. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium, cover and simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the sour cream, simmer for another 2 minutes. Serve immediately with chopped parsley. Add a dollop of sour cream to each bowl if desired.
  3. Served with crusty bread.

 

Mushroom Soup

 

20 Responses

  1. Jeanie

    wrote on

    Looks really yummy, and I LOVE mushrooms so, I will definitely try this one.

    • wrote on

      Thanks, Jeanie! Hope you enjoy it! Let me know how it turns out for you.

      • Jeanie Owens

        wrote on

        I made it tonight. We loved it! So good, buttery and warming on a cold winters night.

        • wrote on

          I’m so glad you all liked it! As noted in my post, it’s really good made a little thicker and used as a sauce over egg noodles as well. In any case, I’m happy to have been able to add a little warmth to your cold winter’s night :)

    • wrote on

      Thanks, Lindsay. Veganizing would be a breeze. I would substitute organic canola oil for the butter (I love cooking with extra virgin olive oil, but the taste may end up dominating this particular soup), vegetable broth for the beef broth, non-dairy sour cream, and either hemp or rice milk (rice milk is very thin – if using that I would recommend increasing the amount of non-dairy sour cream to make for a more creamy consistency. This soup lends easily lends itself to a vegan version and will still taste perfectly yummy!

    • wrote on

      Thanks, Lindsay! Veganizing this recipe would be a breeze! I would substitute organic canola oil for the butter (I love cooking with olive and coconut oils, but those flavors would most likely dominate this particular soup too much), vegetable broth for the beef broth, non-dairy sour cream, and hemp milk. Other milk substitutes, like rice milk, are much thinner in consistency. If using rice milk I would increase the amount of non-dairy sour cream to make for a creamier consistency. In any case, this soup lends itself easily to a vegan version and will still taste absolutely yummy! Thanks for stopping by!

  2. pam defeis

    wrote on

    Made it last night and it was wonderful….Happy group! Next time Ill try it over egg noodles…but as a soup…I loved it (oh…used the vegi broth instead of Beef broth and it was still great!

  3. wrote on

    In this cold, winter weather this soup hits the spot! Thanks for sharing such a tasty recipe!

    -Shannon

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      You are most welcome and thanks for giving it a try!

  4. wrote on

    […] I'm not sure if I've linked the recipe before, as I've made it once before, but just in case: Hungarian Mushroom Soup Recipe – The Daring Gourmet It's pretty Dukan friendly except for the butter and flour – but those are all things that we can […]

  5. Boletus

    wrote on

    Why on earth would you put soya suce in a Hungarian influenced mushroom soup?
    Neither soya sauce, nor butter have much to do with traditional Hungarian cooking, This is the second Hungarian mushroom soup recipe I find in which soya sauce is given as an ingredient. Skip the soya sauce, but use more galrlic, add savory and thyme.
    Broth is also totally unnecessary…again, most recipes seem to add some sort of broth to mushroom soups. Use porcini and other forest mushrooms to enhance the flavour, not broth cubes and the like…
    Otherwise it sounds and looks okay :)
    To make it a real winter treat: include some smoked bacon or ham. Hungarians love to put stuff like that into their rustic foods.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Boletus, there’s a simple explanation: Because it tastes great that way! Make it as written and you’ll agree. It’s been a common movement in the world of cooking for years to blend culinary influences to achieve wonderful results. And using broth has been an even longer practice, especially when the soup is vegetarian and doesn’t have the flavor that would otherwise come from browning meat or frying bacon. On the point about bacon I agree with you whole-heartedly, there are few dishes that wouldn’t benefit from the inclusion of bacon – it’s a simply marvelous creation! The same is true of butter. And porcini mushrooms…yes! I’m a huge fan of adding some ground porcini to mushroom soups and sauces for flavor and several of my recipes do just that. They add such a fabulous flavor!

  6. Boletus

    wrote on

    Hi Kimberley,
    I am aware of globalization affecting the way people cook and the ingredients they use and while “fusion cooking” is trendy and intreresting, I feel it is all the more important to really know the roots and to bring out the best from the authentic recipes with the use of limited “indigenous” ingredients. Yeah, I know, Hungarians would never have created their emblematic stews without the famous paprika, which was introduced to Europe from the Americas, but in our times it’s really worthwhile to try to taste and learn to appreciate more simple and well defined dishes connected to different regions of the world.
    Broth: yes, I know about this practice, sometimes use it myself ( though no cubes) but a really good mushroom soup will not really need this additive, Maybe I’m a purist but it is especially the trends brought about by fusion cooking that makes me one.
    Footnote: On the other hand I do put mushrooms esp. porcini in the beef soup I make :)
    BTW I am Hungarian, live in Budapest and think that your website hosts a wonderful range of recipes.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      We think alike in many ways, Boletus. My biggest passion is ethnic cuisine and while I develop many recipes that have world influences, I also develop ones that are strictly authentic (in those case, and in only those cases, will I make the claim of authenticity). I couldn’t agree more with you that sometimes it’s the simplest recipes that taste best, preparing the ingredients thoughtfully in such a way to bring out their full, pure flavors. By the way, I’ve visited Hungary several times, love the country and its people (Budapest is one of my most favorite cities) and Hungarian cuisine ranks among my favorites. I appreciate your thoughts and hope you’ll visit again. Kind regards, Kimberly

  7. Boletus

    wrote on

    Yes, I read that you’ve been visiting Hungary. The country info with the account of your personal impressions given in the introduction to your goulash soup recipe is quite touching and surely much appreciated by any Hungarian reading it. I see that you perhaps tend to adapt the recipes of ethnic foods a bit to suit the American taste (eg. butter instead of lard) and there is nothing wrong with that,it happens to recipes all the time, as they travel around the globe, it’s basically logical. While I might shudder at the thought of adding soya sauce to any Hungarian dish, it is true that one of the biggest joys of cooking is to experiment with different ingredients and new flavour combinations.I did note that the intro to the mushroom soup recipe said that the soup is Hungarian INFLUENCED (ie.not authentic Hungarian), so nothing misleading there either.
    Best wishes from Budapest: Imre (aka Boletus, at least on the Daring Gourmet website :)

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