Indian Mango Chutney

homemade Indian mango chutney recipe canning easy authentic traditional  

Winter brings with it a generous harvest of tropical fruits.  And though National Mango Day is August 14th, you’ve probably noticed some good deals on mangoes lately.  I scooped up a basket full of them to make a big batch of Indian Mango Chutney to bottle.

Chutney dates back to 500 BC.  Chutneys are endless in variety and ingredients, but they generally consist of fruit, vinegar, and sugar cooked down to a reduction. The word “chutney” is derived from the Sanskrit word caṭnī, meaning to lick.  In other words, finger-lickin’ good!

Here is a recipe I developed a few years ago for an Indian Mango Chutney.  It’s sweet and spicy and is delicious either as a spread, a dip, or used in cooking a variety of Indian cuisine (recipes will follow!).  Ginger, garlic and red chilies are sauteed in oil and then cumin, coriander, turmeric, cloves, cinnamon and cardamom are added to coax out their robust flavors.  Fresh mango, sugar and vinegar is added and it is slowly cooked down to a sticky and delicious concoction.

Another spice that is in this recipe is nigella, which comes from an annual flowering plant native to south and southwest Asia.  Other names for it include black cumin, onion seed and kalonji.  It’s hard to describe the flavor of nigella.  Wikipedia describes them as “a combination of onions, black pepper and oregano, with a bitterness like mustard seeds.”  The flavor is really unlike anything you’ve tasted before.  It’s fantastic!  I love to use it at every possible opportunity when I make Indian or Middle Eastern foods.  It’s wonderful in curries and it positively transforms breads and potatoes.  Nigella is commonly sprinkled on naan bread in India and is a wonderful spice to use in any “carb-based” dish.  It’s adds a delicious dimension of flavor to this mango chutney.

This chutney is great as a stand-alone spread, but it’s also fantastic to cook with.  Here are three recipes using this chutney and more will come:

Mango Chutney Chicken

Mango Chutney Chicken 1 final Grilled Cheese & Chutney Sandwiches

Grilled Cheese Mango Chutney Sandwich 2 Pulled Chicken Mango Sandwiches

Pulled Mango Chicken 1 sm Before we move on to the chutney recipe, please take a moment to “like” The Daring Gourmet on Facebook so you’ll never miss a recipe!  

So happy to have you on board!

Now, let’s get started on that heavenly chutney!

You’ll need about 4-5 ripe mangoes.

Mango Chutney prep 1

Peel the mangoes.

Mango Chutney prep 2

Cut off as much of the mango off the stubborn pit as you can and chop up the mango flesh.  Set aside.

Mango Chutney prep 7

Get some fresh ginger and garlic.

Mango Chutney prep 3

Finely mince the ginger and garlic.

Mango Chutney prep 4

Over medium-high heat, heat some vegetable oil in a medium stock pot and saute the garlic, ginger and some diced red chilies for about a minute.

Mango Chutney prep 5

Add the spices and saute for another minute.

Mango Chutney prep 6

Add the chopped mangoes to the pot.

Mango Chutney prep 8

Add the sugar and salt.

Mango Chutney prep 9

Add the white vinegar.

Mango Chutney prep 10

Stir up the mixture and bring to a boil.  Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue on a steady simmer for one hour.

Mango Chutney prep 11

After an hour of simmering.  Depending on how finely you diced the mango, you can either leave it as is, or you can use a potato masher or blender stick to mash up some of the larger pieces.

Mango Chutney prep 12

After a bit of mashing.

Mango Chutney prep 13

Indian Mango Chutney
 
Delicious as sweet and spicy spread, dipping sauce, or condiment to add to your curries.
:
Recipe type: Condiment
Cuisine: Indian
Serves: About 5 Pints
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, finely minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 red chili, sliced
  • 2 teaspoons whole nigella seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • ½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 4-5 mangoes, peeled and diced
  • 2 cups white granulated sugar
  • 1 cup white vinegar
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil over medium-high in a medium stock pot. Saute the ginger, garlic and red chilies for a minute. Add the spices and saute for another minute. Add the diced mangoes, sugar, salt, and vinegar and stir to combine. Bring it to a rapid boil and reduce to medium-low. Steady simmer for 1 hour. Remove from heat and allow it to cool. If you prefer smaller chunks, use a potato masher to mash the mixture to the desired consistency.
  2. For storage, chutney will keep for a while because of the high acidity content. A conservative time frame would be up to 2 months in the fridge (in a sealed jar) or for several months in the freezer. Canning of course yields the longest shelf-life.

 

Mango Chutney 1 sm Mango Chutney prep 1

78 Responses

  1. wrote on

    Wowwww… Chutney looks simply amazing and tempting.. love the pictures too.. First time here.. lovely blog.. Happy to follow your space :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thank you so much for visiting and for your compliment! Just visited your blog as well – absolutely gorgeous and my kind of food :) Glad to have connected with you. – Kimberly

  2. wrote on

    More food that I just love! Congrats on a delicious-looking recipe!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Johan, you have good taste! Thanks for visiting!

  3. wrote on

    Mango Chutney is my new favorite condiment. Have only had store-bought so far. Your recipe sounds really good and quite easy to make. Well done, Daring Gourmet!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Kathleen! Agreed – mango chutney is fabulous. For savory dishes, I use the Indian Mango Chutney you’re referring to. When I use it for making sweets and desserts, I leave the nigella seeds out. Thanks for stopping by and I hope you’ll visit again!

  4. Susan

    wrote on

    After seeing all of your delicious posts using this mango chutney, I bought all the ingredients and made it! I was a bit scared, but after using your step by step pictures, it was actually easy to make and I felt like a little gourmet in training. Thanks!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      “Susan the Gourmet.” It has a nice ring to it :) Awesome! Glad you were daring enough to make it! And the chutney freezes really well. I freeze it in little plastic containers so that I don’t have to thaw the whole amount when I need to use it. It is deeeeeelicious adding some of it to an Indian curry.

  5. wrote on

    [...] chutney but I followed my belly and made homemade mango chutney.  I ended up loosely following this recipe, adding diced onion and adjusting the spices a little bit.  It’s good stuff.   Along with [...]

  6. Carole

    wrote on

    Lovely work, Kimberly. Thanks for adding it to the “jam” session! Cheers

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      As always, thank you for the invite! :)

  7. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Love your Blog, I am new here but I have made so far 2 recipes, Loved them!!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello and welcome!! Thank you so much for the compliment! Which recipes have you made so far?

  8. Steph Boone

    wrote on

    The write-up of the recipes with pictures is beautiful and tempting. I wish you would have used a different picture on the contents page because that one looked like vomitus to me and I almost looked no further.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Steph, I couldn’t agree more! There’s a weird glitch in my website that causing the “Popular Posts” grid on the sidebar to pull from the step-by-step photos rather than the main photo. Haven’t figured it out yet and it’s very frustrating! Anyway, I’m glad you went ahead and clicked on the pic, vomitus and all! :)

  9. Eva

    wrote on

    Hello, I just made a mango chutney based on your recipe. I modified a bit though cause i didn’t dare to put so much vinegar in. Still it is too much for me, but as I read other descriptions and recipes i think this is quite normal. Put them in sterilized jars, and I hope to try them soon :)
    Mine doesn’t looks more greenish…
    thanks for the recipe :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Welcome back, Eva! So happy you made this! Yes, mango chutney usually has quite a lot of vinegar in it. It tempers the sweetness, adds flavor, and it raises the acid level of the chutney so that it can be safely canned for long-term storage. Mangoes are naturally low in acid and so in canning it’s all about getting the pH level right so that botulism can’t form. Vinegar and sugar are both used in combination to achieve that. That said…being from Europe myself, I’m well aware that attitudes towards canning are quite different there than they are here in the U.S. In Europe (and generations ago here) people can freely without using lots of vinegar and sugar and there have been very rare cases of botulism. We tend to be a little over-the-top here in the U.S. with our safety/germ-phobia standards. So, most likely, in reducing the amount of vinegar in the chutney you’ll be just fine. I confirmed this whole canning thing with a friend of mine who is a pathologist, and expert in the world of germs, and he told me that he wouldn’t hesitate to eat any canned items so long as the lids have not popped up (indicating germ growth). SO…that was a long-winded way to simply say: Thanks for making this recipe and enjoy! :) – Kimberly

      • Eva

        wrote on

        and oeps I did it again :D my love is really enjoying Indian food and he bought me few mangos to do it. He said this chutney could be sold in the local Indian restaurant as this is much much better :) so thank you again :)

        • The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          Fantastic, Eva, that is quite the compliment! :) Thanks so much for the feedback!

  10. Anonymous

    wrote on

    How many regular sized jam/chutney jars does this make?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello! This recipe yields approximately 5 one-pint jars of chutney.

  11. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Nice recipe…I’ve choosen this one out of many others to make tomorrow. Tks for putting it up here. Joyce Merne. Ireland

  12. Joyce Merne

    wrote on

    I’m new here. Will be making your mango chutney tomorrow…..I can taste it already, thanks for posting

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thank you, Joyce, and welcome! I’m happy you’re making this recipe! When I make it I’ll sometimes divide the recipe between two pots so I can make one with the nigella seeds and one without (for the few items that are strictly sweet-based). I love adding this chutney to curries – its adds such a wonderful flavor to the finished dish! I hope you like it!

      P.S. Someone just left a comment a few days ago about preferring to use less vinegar. The vinegar level of this recipe is comparable to the Indian chutneys I used when I lived in the UK and it’s the standard amount that’s typically used for mango chutney. Still, the amount of vinegar can be tweaked to whatever your personal preference is. Let me know your thoughts once you’ve tried it!

  13. Nerissa

    wrote on

    This looks like a wonderful recipe for mango chutney…lots of spices :) I just love chutneys and Indian food! Just came across your blog yesterday and am loving your recipes, looking forward to following your posts.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks so much, Nerissa! I’m thrilled you found my blog – welcome aboard!

  14. wrote on

    Hi – just thought you would like to know I have used your recipe as the basis for an Indian-style plum chutney. I love very spicy chutneys, so couldn’t find a recipe for plum chutney that really suited me, but thought, that as plums are sweet and perfumed, a little like mangoes, it might work to use a mango chutney recipe. I tried it, and it worked – we have lots of delicious Plumgo Chutney… Thanks so much for your very helpful instructions and fab recipe.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Excellent, I’m so glad it worked out and that you’re happy with the results! Plum chutney sounds marvelous. Thanks for your feedback! Best, Kimberly

  15. Samantha

    wrote on

    Just wanted to thank you for this recipe. The best one I’ve found! I return here every few months to whip up a new batch to always have around in the fridge. Thanks !

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s wonderful, Samantha, I’m thrilled to hear that and really appreciate your feedback! Best, Kimberly

  16. Trace

    wrote on

    This is awesome! I doubled the chilli cos like it spicy. Would totally recommend!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Wonderful, I’m glad you enjoyed it, Trace! Thank you for your feedback!

  17. Patrick

    wrote on

    Any specific recommendations if I want to can this in a water bath canner? Head space, jar size? Processing time? Thanks! Looks marvelous, everyone at work is requesting a jar to try

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Patrick! Absolutely, this is perfect for canning and that’s what I do with it every year. Just bought a basket of mangoes this week for that very purpose. Leave 1/4 inch head space and process for 10 minutes. Jar size simply depends on how quickly you intend to go through it. I make some in pint-sized jars and some in 1/2 pint jars. 1/2 pint jars also make a perfect gift. Happy canning! Best, Kimberly

      • Patrick

        wrote on

        That’s so funny I was JUST checking back to see if you had responded, because I’m about to get started! Ha! Happy canning to you too! I’ll let you know what everyone thinks

        • The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          Sounds great, Patrick!

  18. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Hi There,
    Can’t wait to try this recipe, it’s definitely the most promising one I’ve found! One question: what do you think of substituting brown sugar and/or jaggery? If I do so, should I also adjust the amount of vinegar? Would the flavor of the chutney be greatly impacted?
    Thanks!
    Mary

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thank you for the compliment, Mary! I haven’t tried it with brown sugar before, so I really can’t offer an opinion. Brown sugar is simply white sugar with molasses added to it, so if you do use it, you wouldn’t have to adjust the vinegar. Yes, two cups of brown sugar would alter the flavor of the chutney, but whether that alteration would be a good – or not so good – thing, I’m not sure. If you experiment with that, let us know how it turns out!

  19. wrote on

    Hi! :) ..
    Haven’t checked out your blog in some while, but saw this and had to come here and comment! ..
    We eat mango chutney a lot, but not in the ways you have used it – very interesting! Need to try them out.
    Do you get raw mango’s there? We make mango chutney and different kinds of mango pickles along with sherbats only from the raw mango (its known as Keri), so the flavor is more tart than sweet.
    Still waiting for proper mango season here (it stats mid-may) then I am going to try this variation of chutney as well.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Kiran! I love adding this chutney to some of the curries I make. It adds such a wonderful depth and flavor dimension. And, of course, I love using it as a dip for naan. Raw mangoes are next to impossible to find here, so we just use what we have available. Thanks for visiting!

  20. wrote on

    Mango Chutney is a fave, I just love it! I really need to try this one. Thanks for the recipe, Kimberly!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Del! I LOVE what it does to transform a curry.

  21. wrote on

    Absolutely divine. Fun to make! Thank you so much for a wonderful, delicious Sunday family dinner.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’m thrilled to hear it was a hit, Ang! Thank you for your feedback!

  22. Sandra

    wrote on

    Hi, found your recipe this morning, had bought a case of mangoes and was planning on making chutney. Loved the look of this recipe and have just made it, it is simmering on the stove as I write. I know it will be delicious and plan on making a second batch tomorrow. I love to give my home made chutney as gifts at Christmas….if it lasts that long! Really into cooking Indian food, so cannot wait to serve this up with it.
    Thanks so much!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Sandra and welcome! I’m thrilled you found my site and are making this chutney! We love it. I use it regularly in my Indian dishes and always like to have plenty on hand. I’m on my last jar right now from last August and the flavor or seems to get better with time. Last week I used it again to make my Mango Chutney Chicken. Give that one a try and you’ll love it! I love to give this chutney away as gifts as well. Happy chutney-making!

  23. Deborah Niskin

    wrote on

    Kimberly, thank you so much for the chutney recipe! As everyone else, I loved it. I live in Miami and have made a lot of chutney from the mangoes in my yard, but yours is the best for my taste. The only thing I changed was that I mixed hard ripe and ripe mangoes. I bought nigella seeds, but never knew a good way to use them. Now I will experiment, thanks to you.

    Kiran wrote about raw mangoes. Does that mean truly unripe/green mangoes or the green ripe ones I used. Green ripe ones are green on the outside but ripe looking on the inside. They are not soft. Kiran wrote

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Deborah, I’m so happy you enjoyed it and thanks for your feedback! I’m envious of your mango trees! It’s my understanding that raw (ie, “green”) mangoes are a different variety of mango sold throughout Pakistan, Thailand, etc. They’re not unripe regular mangoes and don’t change color with time. Their flesh remains more crisp and tart. You can find them in some well-stocked Indian grocery stores, but it’s challenging. I have not tried making chutney with regular unripe mangoes. If you do (maybe halving the recipe to experiment), let us know what you think of the outcome! Best, Kimberly

  24. Sandra

    wrote on

    Hi Kimberley:
    Was so pleased with the chutney recipe that I am making a double batch today!! Will be adding raisins to one of them, as I do so like raisins in my chutney as well as without. Funnily, both our daughters dislike raisins in any cooked food, so they will be receiving the raisin free chutney in their stockings at Christmas. LOL
    Thanks again for this website….I will also be making the mango chutney chicken tonight. Your work is much appreciated.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s wonderful, Sandra! You know, that really is funny you mention the raisins. I like raisins in my chutney as well but my husband can’t stand them, which is one of the reasons I didn’t include them! This chutney really does make a lovely Christmas gift – something different from the usual homemade jams and preserves. You will LOVE the mango chutney chicken! Even my 2 and 4 year old kids devour it :) Thank you so very much for your feedback. Cheers, Kimberly

      • Sandra

        wrote on

        Yes Kim, the mango chutney chicken was a hit! My husband wants to know when I will be making it again.
        At this rate, I will go through my chutney fairly quickly,….better make some more! Keep on cooking!!

        • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          That’s wonderful, Sandra, I’m so glad you both enjoyed it! The Mango Chutney Chicken is a regular in our home. And yes, I always make sure to have plenty of that chutney on hand :) Thanks so much for your feedback!

  25. wrote on

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  26. Heinz

    wrote on

    Hello Kimberly, I’m going to try your recipe today after I pick up some kalonji at my local Indian market. Question: do you have a nutritional breakdown for your recipe?

    Regards,

    Heinz

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello, Heinz! I do not have the nutritional breakdown, but there are many websites where you can enter the ingredients and their quantity and they’ll generate all those details for you. Just two examples are caloriecount.com and fitday.com. Happy cooking!

  27. Deborah Niskin

    wrote on

    Hi again! Everybody loves your chutney that I made from Lippens mangoes. I am wondering if you have ever tried it with a sugar substitute like pineapple juice? My son hates vinegar, but loves mangoes. I want to make him small amounts for his Bento Box to take to school. Pineapple juice would lower the PH so that I might not have to add vinegar. Maybe some lemon juice… Do you or any of your subscribers have suggestions for me?

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Deborah, I’m happy to hear it was a hit! I have not tried a sugar substitute with this chutney but it can certainly be done and yes, pineapple juice is a common choice. An online search of using pineapple juice as a substitute for sugar in canning will yield a lot of results with information, here is just one of many. Keep in mind that since you’re using a liquid sugar substitute the chutney will be very liquidy so you’ll need to add pectin at the very end and boil hard for a minute to firm it up. For the purposes of lowering the pH level however, pineapple juice won’t work. Lemon juice will. I haven’t tried making this recipe with either substitute so I’m not sure what the outcome will taste like. If you give it a try let us know!

      • Deborah Niskin

        wrote on

        Thanks so much. I will be trying it with Keitt (pronounced kit) mangoes and pineapple juice with lemon juice. I’ll tell you how it went. Thanks again

  28. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Omg! This was delicious and easy. My husband is from India so I am always intimidated to share indian dishes with the sister-in-laws. They were all raving about my mango chutney and asked me to make more. What a hit – thank you!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Woohoo, that’s great! For more Indian chicken dishes check out the “recipes” tab on the top menu bar (hover over “dishes by region” – “Asia” – “India”). Definitely need to try the Balti Chicken – your sister-in-laws will be coming to YOU for Indian cooking lessons! :)

  29. wrote on

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  30. John

    wrote on

    The best chutney recipe I have found on the net! Thank you very much for sharing it!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      You are very welcome, John, I’m thrilled that you enjoyed it so much!

  31. Anonymous

    wrote on

    i also try this. chutney is very tasty .nice steps nice description.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      So happy you enjoyed it, thank you!

  32. Noopur

    wrote on

    hi Kimberly, I made this chutney and was delicious the first time. the second time I adjusted the ingredients a bit as I as only making it with 2 mangoes and the taste is just not the same.is there a thumb rule to follow when adding sugar and vinegar to this chutney? I would like to be able to preserve this for a bit. Is it possible to substitute the vinegar with something else?Thanks so much for your help

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Noopur, I’m not sure what the exact ratio of ingredients is. If you want to make less I would simply cut the recipe in half, it makes for much easier adjustments. I haven’t tried making it with lemon juice but that would be a natural alternative to the vinegar.

  33. Noopur

    wrote on

    hi Kimberly, I tried without the lemon juice and I feel the chutney was missing a bit of the ‘kick’ which the vinegar brings in.. So will stick to using vinegar. Roughly 4-5 tbsp per mango works great!. Thanks so much for your reply and lovely recipe.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks for your feedback, Noopur, I appreciate it! I agree, the acidic element of the vinegar contributes a lot to the chutney.

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