Shanghai Noodles

Authentic Chinese Shanghai Noodles Recipe

Shanghai, China.  The most populated city in the world.  Bustling with tourists, it is also a major port town, financial hub, business and commerce center, and cultural hotspot.  Amidst the ever-changing dynamics of this global city, one thing remains constant:  Noodles are the way of life.  Plump, handmade noodles are the preference and have been for centuries.  Watching Chinese noodle-makers at work in food stalls along the streets of Shanghai, pulling dough and chopping with cleavers at lightening speed is truly awe-inspiring.  And whatever variations of noodles are served, the most popular remain ones based on rich brown sauces such as the one featured in this authentic recipe.  Not encumbered with a lot other ingredients, the central feature of this dish is, of course, the noodles.  Simple, quick, and satisfying…just what a large city dweller needs.

12croppedCity images courtesy Wikipedia, here and here.

These Shanghai Noodles are fast, easy and so delicious!  You’ll love them!

Shanghai Noodles use pork, but you can substitute chicken, beef or shrimp.  First you marinate the pork for at least 10 minutes.

Shanghai Noodles prep 1

Then cut up the green onions and Napa cabbage (keeping the green parts and firmer white parts separate.  They’re going to be cooked separately so the more tender parts aren’t over-done).  Thinly slice the garlic.

Shanghai Noodles prep 2

Fry the pork in a wok or heavy pan over high heat for a couple of minutes, setting the reserved marinade aside.  I like to use avocado oil for high heat cooking.  Unlike most other oils like vegetable and peanut oil it doesn’t oxidize (ie, free radicals, heart disease/carcinogenic).

Shanghai Noodles prep 3

Remove the pork and set aside.  Next cook the white parts of the green onions and cabbage along with the garlic for about 30 seconds or until tender.  Then add the green parts of the cabbage and green onions and cook for another 30 seconds.

Shanghai Noodles prep 5

Return the pork to the pan along with the reserved marinade, the sesame oil, and the chicken stock/cornstarch mixture.  Stir to combine and cook for 30 seconds.

Shanghai Noodles prep 6

Add the cooked noodles and stir to coat.

Shanghai Noodles prep 7

Serve immediately.

shanghai noodles fried noodles chinese recipe

Shanghai Noodles
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • ⅓ cup+ dark soy sauce (see Note)
  • ¼ cup oyster sauce (vegan: use hoisin sauce)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1½ tablespoons fresh ginger, finely minced
  • 1 lb pork tenderloin, sliced thinly (vegetarian/vegan: use tofu following directions from Kung Pao Chicken recipe at http://www.daringgourmet.com/2013/01/08/30/)
  • 1 lb thick round egg noodles, cooked according to package instructions (fresh noodles are even better, in which case cut the sauce in half because the fresh noodles weigh more) (vegans: use wheat noodles)
  • 2 tablespoons high heat cooking oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, sliced thinly
  • 6 green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces and then julienned lengthwise (keep green and white parts separate)
  • ½ head Napa cabbage, thinly sliced (white and pale green parts kept separate)
  • 1½ tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1½ tablespoons sesame oil
  • Ground white pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. To make the marinade, combine the soy sauce, oyster sauce, sugar and ginger and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Place the pork in the marinade and let sit for 10 minutes.
  2. Heat the oil in a wok or heavy skillet on high heat and fry the pork for one minute or until done (set the reserved marinade aside). Remove the pork and set aside. Next fry the white parts of the cabbage and green onions along with the garlic for 30 seconds or until tender. Return the pork to the pan along with the reserved marinade, the sesame oil, chicken/cornstarch mixture and the green parts of the cabbage and green onions. Cook for 30 seconds. Add the noodles and stir until combined. Add white pepper to taste. Serve immediately.
Notes
The saltiness of the soy sauce varies from brand to brand. Start with a ⅓ cup and add more as desired.

Asian food lovers, don’t forget to try this recipe for the Best Homemade Teriyaki Sauce!

Shanghai Noodles

 

You May Also Like:

40 Responses

  1. Candy

    wrote on

    This looks so good and so easy to make!!..i am definatly making it after baby is born…i can’t wait for him to come out so i can start cooking again!!!…thanks for the recipe and i do like the new blog way better…i love the print button :)

  2. wrote on

    Your noodle dish looks very delicious! I can’t wait to try this out! Thanks for sharing. :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks for the compliment and for stopping by!

  3. wrote on

    This was really flavorful and satisfying. I let my meat marinate for about a half hour, and I added srirarcha and sweet chili sauce to it. I used buckwheat noodles and the meat was tender and well seasoned. I’d make this regularly.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks for much for visiting and for the compliment! So happy you made and enjoyed it! I love buckwheat and I like your addition of the sweet chili sauce. Thanks for your feedback!

  4. Lilone

    wrote on

    I’m not a fan of sesame oil, can I leave that out?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Lilone! The sesame oil contributes a great deal of flavor to the noodles, but yes, you can leave it out. There are still several other ingredients in the recipe that contribute a lot to the overall flavor. You could even add a tablespoon or two of hoisin sauce for some added flavor.

  5. Alicia

    wrote on

    I made this last night, and it was ridiculously delicious and a big hit. But for some reason, it was too salty…=/ I think I’ll opt for low sodium soy sauce next time.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Alicia! I’m SO thrilled to hear it was a hit! Too salty, really? I am surprised considering it’s just 1/2 cup soy sauce for the whole dish. Did you use an entire pound of pork and a pound of pasta? Did you perhaps cook the pasta salted water? In any case, I’m so happy you made this and that everyone enjoyed it!

  6. Anonymous

    wrote on

    i will definitely make this one for Halloween party, for sure kids will love this :)

  7. wrote on

    […] Shanghai Noodles are usually served as a side to either beef, pork, or chicken.  There is also the option of serving these noodles as the main course.  Easily prepared in under thirty minutes. […]

  8. Sara

    wrote on

    I was thrilled to find your site as, like most of us, I get into those lulls where I just don’t know what to make. Today I was craving some lo-mein and was delighted to come across this recipe. I agree with another reader about it being to salty, so I cut back to 1/4 cup soy and replaced the last 1/4 cup with a bunch of other things (lemon, rice vinegar, sriracha, beef broth). Also figured out I didn’t have the noodles after I came home from the store, so I got into a cooking kick and made my own. Good base recipe, can’t wait to try some of your others. Thanks for dinner guidelines.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Sara and welcome! Fantastic, I’m glad you enjoyed this recipe and that’s impressive that you made your own noodles! So happy to have you on board and look forward to your feedback as you have the chance to try some other recipes! Best, Kimberly

  9. gracie

    wrote on

    I need to try this…this looks so yummo

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Gracie, it really is superlicious – I love how all the flavors come together!

  10. wrote on

    This recipe looks delicious, can’t wait to try it. Do you think I could use rice noodles instead?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks, Bonnie! Yes, you can absolutely use rice noodles. Enjoy!

  11. wrote on

    Found some great recipes here, thanks!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks so much, Gale, and welcome!

  12. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Hi.. I am not sure if you can still read this comment or not.. But can I use spaghetti noodles? I don’t have chinese noodles on hand.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello! Yes, you can. Not quite the same texture or flavor but they’ll definitely work. Be sure to cook the noodles on the al dente side so they’re not mushy.

  13. Reanne

    wrote on

    I enjoyed this recipe however I doubled it and it was unbelievably salty!!!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’m going to add a note about the brand of soy sauce, Reanne, because another person has commented about the same thing. Saltiness varies greatly from brand to brand.

  14. suzi

    wrote on

    Question…regarding sesame oil…what kind do you use. I bought some dor another dish and the smell of the oil was overwhelming…the whole dish tasted like the smell …it was terrible. Im afraid i bought the wrong kind?

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Suzi, I’ve used all brands. Most recently I finished a bottle of Kadoya and right now am using Spectrum. Sesame oil does have a strong flavor and it’s one that you either love or dislike. If you typically like sesame oil but didn’t like it this time, it may be that your oil was rancid. Sadly sometimes oils are rancid right off the grocery store shelves.

  15. jennifer

    wrote on

    Hi Kimberly, another hit! I kept going back to the wok, to put a forkful into my mouth. I think, I’ll add some more vegetables in it next time, but great flavour :)

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Awesome, so glad you enjoyed it, Jennifer! Yes, this is a very basic “street food” dish from China and lends itself well to added embellishments.

  16. dee

    wrote on

    where do i find chinese noodles???

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Dee, the recipe calls for thick round egg noodles (shaped like spaghetti). You can find them in many well-stocked grocery stories, in Asian stores, or online.

  17. mom2abc

    wrote on

    why is peanut oil carcinogenic and not avocado oil? they are both a mono-saturated fat just like olive oil….

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Peanut oil is primarily comprised of poly-unsaturated fats and that’s where the problem lies. Take a look at the following article for a breakdown of the chemical composition of peanut, avocado, olive, and all the other commonly used oils for cooking: A Comprehensive Guide To Cooking Oils: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

  18. mom2abc

    wrote on

    actually, only avocado oil that has been highly refined can be used in high temperature frying, unrefined (which is where the antioxidants are) has a much lower smoking point and is only suitably used in salad dressing.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That is incorrect. Both refined and unrefined avocado oil have an incredibly high smoke point (unrefined: 480 degrees, refined: 520 degrees). It’s an excellent oil for high heat cooking, whether refined or not.

  19. mom2abc

    wrote on

    peanut oil has a 33% polyunsaturated profile, more than avocado, but hardly in the realm of of sunflower or corn oil. unrefined avocado does not have a 480 F smoke point from all the sources that I’ve looked at. And I wanted to love avocado oil, its great when freshly opened, but I’ve found it develops off flavors much more quickly than my other oils. I do not like to cook at high temperatures often, oils aside, high temperature cooking of either carbohydrates or proteins create carcinogens, regardlless of oil used. There’s just no getting around that.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Your first statement is correct – which is why peanut, sunflower and corn oil really should all be avoided along with a host of other oils. Refined avocado oil’s smoke point: Again, I’m not sure what sources you’re referring to, but both refined and unrefined avocado oils have high smoke points. Avocado oil is quite exceptional in that respect. In my experience it’s virtually flavorless and keeps well, but as for its freshness, I would imagine that varies from brand to brand. I’m currently using the Chosen Foods brand that is sold at Costco for about the best price I’ve found. As for high-heat cooking in general, I agree, we don’t do it very often either (eg, deep-frying). On a side note, the fact is the best “oil” for high-heat cooking is animal fat/lard. We now know (and the FDA has finally squeaked out a sheepish acknowledgment to the fact) that saturated fat isn’t the villain it’s been made out to be for many decades, but it’s still going to take a while before our food culture and grocery stores reflect that.

  20. amy

    wrote on

    I’ve had this recipe sitting on my Pinterest for quite a while and a few weeks ago, the pork was on sale so bought it.
    I decided to make it tonight. I’ve only made one other Asian dish before and I did not grow up eating this type of food so I was pretty intimidated. It was easier than I thought, I think I used too much chicken broth because it seemed too soupy, but other than that it was very good and even better, my husband had seconds! Tasty and simple. Thanks!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Amy, I’m glad it was a hit – and I’m especially glad to hear that you stifled your fears and made the dish, hooray! If it was too soupy it sounds like you may not have let the broth/cornstarch mixture simmer quite long enough to allow it to thicken. Next time you’ll have it down like a pro :) Thanks so much for the feedback! Best, Kimberly

Trackbacks

Leave a Comment