Mongolian Beef

Mongolian beef recipe pf changs copycat best authentic easy fast

Mongolian Beef.  Succulent.  Tender.  Full of flavor.  Though neither the ingredients nor the method of cooking is Mongolian in origin, the name is widely known and the dish is served throughout much of the Western world and in virtually every Chinese restaurant.  Some claim this dish is Chinese-American, while others claim it was first invented in a Chinese restaurant in the UK.  Regardless of its origin, one thing is clear:  It’s very popular, and for good reason.  Now you can make it at home with this recipe anytime the craving comes calling and this Daring Gourmet version comes with a “satisfaction guaranteed.”

Simple and quick, this Mongolian Beef can be waiting at your table, ready to eat, within 10 minutes.

Move over, P.F. Chang’s…you’ve got some serious competition!

This recipe is perfectly suited for a chicken and vegetarian/vegan version as well.  See recipe below for instructions.

If you haven’t already, come connect with me on The Daring Gourmet’s Facebook Page.  Would love to have you on board!

Thinly slice the beef and mince the garlic and ginger.

Mongolian Beef prep 1

Coat the beef strips with cornstarch.

Mongolian Beef prep 2

Heat the oil in a wok or heavy skillet and fry the beef until golden brown on both sides.

Mongolian Beef prep 3

Remove the beef and discard all but about 2 teaspoons of the oil.

Mongolian Beef prep 4

Prepare the sauce by combining all ingredients, except for the garlic and ginger, in a bowl.  Fry the ginger and garlic for 30 seconds.  Add the sauce mixture and simmer, constantly stirring, until it begins to thicken.

Mongolian Beef prep 5

Slice the green onions.

Mongolian Beef prep 7

Return the beef to the wok along with the green onions and stir to coat.  Simmer for 1 minute and serve immediately with steamed rice and/or crispy fried cellophane noodles.  Serves 4.

Mongolian Beef prep 6 Mongolian beef recipe pf changs copycat best authentic easy fast homemade

 

Mongolian Beef
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Move over, P.F. Chang's...you've got some serious competition!
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Recipe type: Stir Fry
Cuisine: Chinese
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 lb flank steak or beef tenderloin, cut into thin strips (this recipe also works great with chicken) (See note for vegan option)
  • Cornstarch for coating
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • For the Sauce:
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce (a critical ingredient, can be found in any Asian store or the Asian section of well-stocked supermarkets)
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • ½ cup water
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 2 bunches green onions, cut into 2 inch pieces
Instructions
  1. Add some oil to a hot wok or heavy skillet. Lightly coat the beef strips in cornstarch and shake to remove excess. Stir-fry beef until caramelized on both sides. Remove the meat from the wok and set aside. Discard all but 2 teaspoons of the oil.
  2. To make sauce: Add the ginger and garlic to the wok and stir-fry for about 30 seconds. Add remaining sauce ingredients, except for the green onions. Let the sauce simmer for 2 minutes, until sauce begins to thicken.
  3. Return beef to the sauce and stir to coat. Add the green onions and stir again to coat. Simmer for 1 minute seconds. Serve immediately with steamed rice and/or crispy fried cellophane noodles.
Notes
Vegetarian/Vegan: Use Yves Meatless Beef Strips, Butler's Soy Curls or tofu (cut into ¼ in. thick, 1 in. long strips and prepared in the fashion as outlined at http://daringgourmet.com/2013/01/15/creamy-mushroom-and-tofu-stroganoff/)

Mongolian Beef

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46 Responses

  1. Danette McKee Farmer

    wrote on

    Made this last night and it was a hit. I did not have flank steak so I used a London Broil instead. Thanks for keeping these easy and packed with flavor!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Wonderful! Most cuts of beef will do the job. If it’s a tougher cut, it can be tenderized first. I’m so glad you tried and liked it! Thanks for your feedback.

  2. wrote on

    Do you need dark or light soya sauce here? I think here dark is all that’s available but I’m afraid if I use that, it might become too salty.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks for asking! What you’ll most commonly find in stores is light soy sauce (and it’s usually just labelled “soy sauce”) and that’s what’s used here. “light” is not to be confused with “low sodium” – they’re two different things. Dark soy sauce is darker (obviously) and has a thicker, almost molasses-like consistency. It’s actually less salty than light soy sauce but because of its stronger flavor thus a smaller quantity is used in cooking with it. You can use either. But if using dark, use less of it and you may actually need to add a little more salt. You can also use a combination of the two. Keep in mind also that dark soy sauce has somewhat of a molasses-like flavor, which you’re already getting from the brown sugar. My recommendation, if you’re using dark soy sauce, would be to use white sugar instead. Let me know how you like the recipe and thanks for stopping by!

  3. wrote on

    I made this last night and it was a huge hit. Huge! Thanks!!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Excellent!! So very happy to hear that. Thanks for giving it a try and for your feedback.

  4. wrote on

    This is the BEST mongolian beef recipe we have tried!!! And we have tried a few!! YUM!!! Next time I think i will add a dash of red pepper flakes for some spice. And I will just pour the mixed sauce over the beef, instead of taking the beef out, and waiting, then adding it back. Hopefully this will help the beef absorb more of the flavor. But I was absolutley delish!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Awesome!! I’m so glad you liked it! I’m very methodical in writing down every little addition as I go along, tasting each step of the way and adding a little more of this and that. I try to perfect my dishes so that they’re “kitchen ready” and will turn out a success for everyone who follows the recipes. When I make them again down the road I often give them an additional little tweak here and there, always reaching for perfection ;) Thanks again for your feedback. Hope you try some other recipes and let me know what you think. Happy cooking! – Kimberly

  5. wrote on

    Just made this for dinner and it came out amazing! I used pork instead of beef (because it was on sale) and I added about 1/2 teaspoon of crushed red pepper flakes because I like the heat. I didn’t bother stir frying the garlic and ginger because I tend to burn those :P I was confused on how much a bundle of green onion was because I bought a prepackaged bag, but I realized that they cook down a lot so next time I’ll use more. Thanks for sharing!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s wonderful, Andrew, I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed it! Thanks for trying it and for your feedback – hope you try some more Daring Gourmet recipes!

  6. Heidi

    wrote on

    Delicious! I added cut up red peppers with the green onion; colorful!
    Next time I might add a little red pepper flakes to give a little heat.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Awesome, Heidi! So glad you liked it!

  7. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Yum…!

  8. wrote on

    I love Mongolian Beef! And I love your photos in this post! They all look so gorgeous and appetizing! I would love to try making this dish at home one of these days.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello, Sharon! Thanks so much for the compliment! This recipe was carefully crafted and I think you will be very happy with the results. Be sure to let me know what you think when you get around to trying it! Thanks for stopping by!

  9. Renee

    wrote on

    Mongolian Beef is one of my husband’s favorite meals. I was told that your recipe is a keeper! I used a flat iron steak and dusted it with cornstarch and let sit for 15 minutes before cooking. I also added 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes to the sauce. My daughter is vegan so I kept some sauce on the side with tofu and we served it all over fried rice noodles. After his rave reviews I explored your website and found you live in Tacoma – so do we! I can’t wait to try another recipe. I’m thinking of going with the chipotle tacos since I’m from San Diego.So happy to connect with you.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Renee! Always happy to meet a fellow Washingtonian – especially one so close! :) So happy to hear the Mongolian beef was a success. I hope you do try some of the other recipes! The tinga poblana tacos are excellent. As long as you like authentic-tasting Mexican food, I’m confident you’re going to enjoy these. Happy to connect with you, too!

  10. wrote on

    [...] browsing a few more recipes, I decided this one from The Daring Gourmet appealed to me most. Thinly sliced steak is sautéed in vegetable oil, and [...]

  11. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Please tell me what kind of beef your using…or cut rather. Just found you! Loving recipes&blog.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello and welcome! Thanks for the compliment and I’m so happy you found my site! For this recipe either flank steak or beef tenderloin will work perfectly.

  12. Anonymous

    wrote on

    this was so good, i’m defiantly gonna make it again. reading the comments i think i will add chili powder, but also maybe some sesame seeds as a garnish

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      So glad you enjoyed it and thank you for your feedback!

  13. Ashley

    wrote on

    Very yummy dish, I couldn’t find hoisin sauce but I did find a similar ‘spicy stir fry’ which worked for the dish and it still tasted great, mushrooms and bell peppers also got tossed in the sauce and it was soo good!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s fantastic, Ashley! And it’s never a bad idea to add in healthy veggies wherever possible ;) Thanks for making this dish and for your feedback!

  14. Elizabeth

    wrote on

    Is it possible to substitute the hoisin sauce with oyster sauce? If so, would it be a 1:1 ratio?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Elizabeth! No, they are two very different ingredients with very different flavors. Stick with hoisin. You can find it at any Asian store or order it online.

  15. wrote on

    [...] beef recipe is probably one of the best favorite beef dishes in the United States. Mongolian beef recipe is not a traditional Mongolian dish. I am personally not sure about the origins of this recipe but [...]

  16. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Your blog is very good. Thank you for including vegetarian alternatives with your recipes.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thank you for the compliment!

  17. Anonymous

    wrote on

    Thank you so much for this recipe, this is exactly the taste I was looking for !

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thank YOU! It makes me so happy to hear that!

  18. Filomena

    wrote on

    Can one substitute flour for cornstarch? If not, any other substitute?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Filomena! There are several substitutes you can try: Arrowroot, Tapioca Starch, and Potato Starch. I wouldn’t recommend flour because it will give the sauce a milky appearance whereas starch doesn’t alter the color. I’ve heard that potato starch is quite difficult to work with – it can solidify very quickly when it’s hits the hot liquid. From what I’ve heard, arrowroot is one of the most common substitutes, particularly in Chinese cooking.

  19. Saranee Mitra Sen

    wrote on

    I made this and it was a winner. I have shared this recipe with others too. One change that I have incorporated is that with the corn flour, I also add a little ground white pepper and Schezwan pepper, while preparing to coat the strips. Also instead of putting the corn flour in the sauce mix, I use it as a thickener once all the veggies (I used some bell peppers and cubed onions), chicken and sauce mix have been cooked together.

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Saranee! Thanks so much for your feedback and I’m happy it was a hit! This Mongolian Beef is made the traditional/authentic way, without any “extras”, but the important thing is that you make it according to how you like it best. If I’m not in the mood to make side vegetables to go with the meal, I’ll occasionally add them to the Mongolian beef (broccoli works nicely, too) for a rounded meal. My whole family loves this recipe as well – in fact, I just made it again last week. Thanks again, Saranee!

  20. Annabelle

    wrote on

    This is so delicious! Oh my gosh! Thank you for the recipe!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Annabelle!

  21. sarah

    wrote on

    It is not mongolian beef, it is chinese food
    that is true

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That’s right, Sarah. As I wrote in the first paragraph: “Though neither the ingredients nor the method of cooking is Mongolian in origin, the name is widely known and the dish is served throughout much of the Western world and in virtually every Chinese restaurant. Some claim this dish is Chinese-American, while others claim it was first invented in a Chinese restaurant in the UK.” So, it’s neither Mongolian nor authentic Chinese – but boy does it taste good! :)

  22. Marie

    wrote on

    Hi. I’ve been looking into cooking this for my partner. He loves it and I want to surprise him with his favourite meal. I’m very impressed with the feedback on this page. I’ve decided to try this recipe but with others recipes ive seen they use brown sugar and oyster sauce instead of hoisins. What’s the difference? It’s my first time to try this so any tips would be greatly apriceted. Thanks in advance :)

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Marie! I’m sorry I’m just now getting back to you. We changed internet providers and it was down for several days. To answer your question, yes, you’ll find many variations out there and it simply comes down to personal preference and taste. Oyster sauce is made with fermented oysters and has an entirely different flavor than hoisin sauce, a very pleasant, mildly sweet sauce. Give this recipe a try and I’m confident you’ll love it!

  23. wrote on

    I’ve tried, several times, to replicate my local chinese restaurant’s excellent mongloian beef sauce, but failed. I’m, now, going to try several internet MB recipes (including yours) and see if I can get any closer to my flavor goal. One thing’s for sure: Hoisin is definitely one of the flavors in their recipe…in fact, if I see a MB recipe without it, I quickly move on.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Howie! Well, I can’t promise this will taste exactly like the mongolian beef at that particular restaurant, but I can promise that it’s GOOD! Give it a try and let us know what you think!

  24. Gayle Lambert

    wrote on

    Hi Kimberly, thank you so much for this wonderful recipe, Hubbie is not a lover of Mongolian Beef but when this was put in front of him his attitude changed, made it last night using lamb strips instead of beef and added 1/4 cup of oyster sauce as well, had friends over for dinner and the compliments came thick and fast, will be searching here in Australia to find suitable ingredients that I can substitute for many other of your recipes

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’m thrilled to hear that, Gayle! So glad it was a hit with your husband and friends. Let me know if I can be of any help suggesting ingredient substitutions if you have a hard time finding anything there. Best, Kimberly

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