Homemade Teriyaki Sauce

homemade teriyaki sauce recipe

It happened one too many times.  I needed teriyaki sauce for a recipe and thought I had some on  hand only to find – after all the other ingredients had already been prepped – that there wasn’t any.  No doubt this is a scenario you can relate to, whether it’s teriyaki sauce or something else.  So I whipped up my own…and have never touched store-bought teriyaki sauce since.  Trust me, after making this, you won’t either. Quick and easy to make, this homemade teriyaki sauce recipe is as versatile as it is delicious.  Use it as a marinade for beef, chicken, fish and seafood, as a glaze, for barbecuing, in Asian salad dressings, in noodle dishes and stir-fries.

Here are just two dishes featuring this Homemade Teriyaki Sauce:  Chicken Teriyaki Noodles

Chicken Teriyaki Noodles

For all you burger fans:  Red Robin Banzai Burger Copycat Recipe

Before we get to that yummy Homemade Teriyaki Sauce, please take a moment to “Like” The Daring Gourmet on Facebook so you’ll never miss a recipe!  

Be sure to also SUBSCRIBE to my blog (upper right corner of this page) to receive email updates when new recipes are posted.  It’s FREE and you’ll never receive junk mail!

Okay, let’s get started!

Making this homemade teriyaki sauce is a simple two-step process.  1)  Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and 2) bring it to a simmer in a small saucepan.

Teriyaki Sauce prep 1Teriyaki Sauce prep 2homemade teriyaki sauce recipe

That’s it!

Enjoy this fantastic teriyaki sauce in the dish of your choice!

Note:  If you prefer a sweeter teriyaki sauce, simply add another tablespoon or so of brown sugar. The sauce will become thicker as it cools.  If you’re using it as a marinade, you can leave the cornstarch out altogether or reduce it by half.  Adjust the amount of thickening according the purpose you’re using the sauce for.

Homemade Teriyaki Sauce Recipe

 

Homemade Teriyaki Sauce
 
:
Serves: about 1 cup
Ingredients
  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • 1½ teaspoons fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon honey (Vegans: use agave nectar)
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 3 tablespoons mirin (see note)
  • ¼ cup water mixed with 3 teaspoons cornstarch
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan, bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool.
  2. Store in the fridge for up to a week.
Notes
Mirin is a sweet Japanese rice wine, similar to sake but with a lower alcohol content and higher sugar content. If you don't have mirin, you can use sherry with a pinch of sugar added to it.

 

You May Also Like:

66 Responses

  1. Darice T

    wrote on

    Just wondering about the brown sugar as recipe states “¼ cup tablespoons brown sugar”. Thanks

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Ah, thanks for catching that, Darice! It’s been corrected – it’s 1/4 cup.

  2. William

    wrote on

    Where is the note about mirin?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Thanks for catching that, William. It is now “visible”!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Taylor! Ohhh, yes – and so quick and easy to make. Great to have on hand for spontaneous meals. Next in line is some teriyaki salmon!

  3. Candy

    wrote on

    Kimberly, what is mirin and where can we buy it?… I want to make this teriyaki sauce and then make the noodles :). It looks so yummy, thanks!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Candy! Thanks for the compliment! Mirin is Japanese rice wine – similar to sake but is sweeter and has a lower alcohol content.

  4. Steffi

    wrote on

    sounds really good. How do you store it? What do you think – how long can you keep it in the fridge?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Steffi! Thanks for the compliment! Yes, store it in the fridge. Because it has fresh garlic and ginger in it, I would give it about a week.

      • Anonymous

        wrote on

        Can I use white sugar instead of brown sugar?? I don’t have time to go to the store

        • The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          It won’t taste quite the same, but yes, you can use white sugar.

  5. Anonymous

    wrote on

    I have wanted a good teriyaki sauce recipe and this one is so so so good! I had to substitute powdered versions of ginger and garlic…and sherry for the mirin…but even still, delicious! Thank you for sharing this! :)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Wonderful, I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed it! Thanks so much for making it and for your feedback!

  6. Anonymous

    wrote on

    loved every minute of it, it’s wonderful to share ||||

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Fabulous! I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed it! Thanks for making it and for your feedback!

  7. Kristen H.

    wrote on

    Looking forward to trying this on tonight’s dinner. I’m using it as a basting sauce for some chicken I’m baking at the moment. Smells absolutely divine in the oven!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Mmmmm, that sounds yummy, Kristen! There are few things that can beat the smell of a roasting chicken!

  8. Elizabeth

    wrote on

    What would you use of you don’t want the alcohol at all?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Elizabeth! Really the only substitutes for mirin and sake would be another form of wine (all of which, by the way, have a much, much lower alcohol content than vanilla extract), but if you’d prefer not to use any, just leave it out and don’t worry about a substitute. I think you’ll still be happy with the flavor of the teriyaki sauce.

  9. Liora

    wrote on

    Made this for tonight’s stir-fry. It was absolutly delicious! Thank you!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Fantastic, Liora, so happy to hear that! Thanks for making this and for your feedback!

  10. wrote on

    I made this tonight for stir fry vegetables on rice. Perfect. I had to look up a substitute for ginger, it was the only ingredient I didn’t have (we lived in Japan for a while so we like to have things like mirin on hand). I used all spice. I think I’d use less of it next time, if I had to substitute again, but really it still came out amazing. My husband told me to hide the sauce so he wouldn’t drink it straight!! He agreed we’ll never buy again, and now we need to thaw chicken so we can grill with this later this week. One question: your picture, before cooking, looks like it contains diced onion. Are those just large pieces of garlic or is onion supposed to be an ingredient?

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hello! That’s wonderful to hear – I’m so glad you all enjoyed it! I love how versatile teriyaki sauce is. Your question: The pieces you see in the picture are just the pieces of garlic and ginger. Thanks so much for your feedback!

  11. wrote on

    […] marinated the boneless chicken thighs in Teriyaki sauce for 30 minutes in the fridge. Make your own like this – I’ll be making my own too soon, but for this time I used store-bought. Alternately […]

  12. Alissa

    wrote on

    I love this recipe! I use 3 tbs of angry orchard’s hard apple ginger cider in place of the ginger and mirin. Sauce comes out delicious and the rest of the bottle pairs well with dinner!

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      That sounds yummy, Alissa, thanks for the feedback!

  13. wrote on

    […] I knew my husband needed at least some seasoning in his food, so I whipped up a tasty cup of homemade teriyaki sauce and used a couple of tablespoonfuls to season the meat balls and vegetables. Leftovers stay good in […]

  14. Renee Drew

    wrote on

    Fixed chicken marinated overnight in teriyaki sauce mixed with minced garlic, ground pepper and curry powder last night. Loved it, but the bottled sauce made it too salty. This sounds yummy! (I use low-sodium soy sauce.)

    • The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Renee! Yes, most everything pre-packaged tends to be high in sodium. That’s just one advantage of homemade – you can easily adjust the salt to meet your dietary needs. You’ll love this sauce!

  15. Frank Two Hawks

    wrote on

    Used saki and a little extra brown sugar. The alcohol evaporates when you heat the sauce since the boiling point of alconol is much lower than water. Sauce was delicious. I’m going to try to add some pineapple juice as an experiment.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Glad you enjoyed it, Frank Two Hawks, and thanks so much for your feedback!

  16. wrote on

    Loved this recipe… it’s a keeper! Hubs slathered on bbq’d London broil last night and I drizzled the last little bit over our fried rice and veggies!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Wonderful! So glad you both enjoyed it, Correen, and thanks for the feedback!

  17. Apaul

    wrote on

    Hello beautiful daring Kimberly,

    Something went drasticly wrong for me! I’m a good salt lover, kosher, sea, Himalayan etc. I put salt on things other people don’t.

    I followed the recipe exactly except for one thing, my measureing cup starts at a half cup and the bottom is a little curved making it difficult to estimate exactly where a quarter cup was for brown sugar, but I like sweet and like brown sugar and made sure there was a little more than my estimate of where a 1/4 was. Yet this was the saltiest thing I’ve ever tasted and was completely inedible so I added more Mirin, more water, more honey, no dice. More water, more honey, some agave, more Mirin, not close. More water, more Mirin, more honey and agave, three fat chunks of pineapple minced and some of the Pinapple juice, TOO SALTY! haha. 6 or 8 more chunks minced, more of the juice, I forget if more of the other stuff except definitely no more Mirin since I finally looked at the label and saw SALT & citric acid, water and SALT again aside from the corn syrup and fermented rice wine extract in it!

    Still too salty. Now the rest of the juice from a 20 oz can of pineapple chunks & probably more water etc until there was only a quarter inch left in the small pot, now being 4 or 5 times the volume of liquid from the original amount and FINALLY it was edible yet still too salty :(

    (oh yeah, I added a minced green onion when I put the chicken in)

    I had already roasted a chicken yesterday & used my homemade chicken stock plus the roast drippings to make a gravy for the one breast I ate before looking for a teriyaki recipe so I used the leftover breast & tore it into the simmering sauce for a while, then I scooped out the chicken & grilled it in a cast iron skillet with severl fresh chunks of pineapple & only the sauce adhering to the chicken, then after I flipped it I poured the little bit of sauce that collected in the bowl I scooped the chicken into on top of the grilling chicken. I scooped it all back into the bowl and all the little bit of sauce I used besides what had soaked into the meat had now been grilled & thickened.

    So the moment of truth, I went to eat the stuff and it was still a little too salty but still GREAT & if I made sure to include a chunk of fantastic grilled pineapple in each bite it was HEAVEN!!! So in the end the disaster was mostly recovered from but something went way wrong.

    However when I adjust this somehow to a reasonable level of salt from the start it will be like whatever is better than heaven :) (this from an athiest)

    One of the commenters mentioned low sodium soy sauce which wasn’t in the recipe. I was going to start with just using much less of the soy I have & see how that works & maybe have to replace the lost liquid with something.

    Unless everyone else knew to use low sodium I can’t understand how this only happened to me because it wasn’t even in the same city as the ballpark :(

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’m scratching my head, Apaul. It sounds like you ended up with more like a gallon of sauce instead of a cup! And still too salty? This is supposed to be a salty, pretty concentrated sauce meant to be used in marinades and mixed in things (diluting its saltiness), but it’s not supposed to be so salty that by licking the spoon you’re left running for the water faucet! Normally I would suggest that the brand of soy sauce may have had something to do with it (some, including one of the more popular brands, are just awful and way too salty), but from what you’ve described the problem extends beyond that. I don’t know Apaul! This recipe’s been tried and proven time and time again and I don’t know what went wrong for you. I’m happy at least that in the end you were able to figure out how to tweak the ratios to satisfy your taste!

  18. wrote on

    Very nice recipe, Kimberly. Used Hawaiian Aloha brand shoyu, which tends to be a touch sweeter than Kikkoman. Followed the recipe exactly (tripled it) except I brought all the ingredients to a simmer before adding the cornstarch and water mixture – I wanted to judge the thickness as I went. Turns out I used all but a tablespoon or two of the cornstarch mixture and it was a perfect thickness for a Teri burger glaze.

    Nice ratio of sweet to salty and a good thick sauce. Definitely better than store bought. Thank you.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Wonderful, scotdc, I’m glad you enjoyed it and thanks so much for your feedback!

      • RollyS

        wrote on

        Kimberly, you are fantastic! I have tried to make most of your recipes already and find that we have a very similar palate. I’ve enjoyed each and everything I have made from your suggestions and I think I’m in love with you!

        • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          You’ve truly made my day, RollyS! :)

  19. Matt

    wrote on

    Just wanted to say thanks. So easy, my kids loved it. Will never buy a jar again! great stuff.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Wonderful, Matt, I’m happy you all enjoyed it!

  20. Ana

    wrote on

    OMG! Just came across your page and found this recipe, I had everything in my pantry except mirin, sent the husband to go get it immediately! Loved, I only had low sodium soy sauce, my son loves the teriyaki chicken from panda express, looks like panda lost a customer and mommy gained one!

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Woohooo! I’m thrilled it was such a hit, Ana, and appreciate the feedback! Absolutely, now you can make it yourself for much cheaper, without any unhealthy additives, and, dare I say, BETTER! :) So happy you found my blog and hope you’ll subscribe and return often. Cheers, Kimberly

  21. C Mathas

    wrote on

    Can this sauce be canned using a hot-bath method of canning?

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      CMathas, I honestly don’t know. Europeans would tell you yes, Americans would say no. Here’s the long answer….The American USDA safety standards state that food must be at a certain pH level in order for bacteria to not be able to form. Hence, you’ll see a lot of vinegar added to many American canning recipes. However, the fact is, bacteria cannot form in airtight spaces, so theoretically anything can be safely canned as long as it’s airtight. That said, there are anaerobic forms of bacteria (germs that can grow without the presence of oxygen) but those are destroyed through following the proper canning procedure of boiling the cans in a water bath. In Europe, no one bothers to check the pH balance of the food being canned and cases of botulism are exceedingly rare. I spoke to a friend here in the U.S. who is a pathologist (medical doctor specializing in germs). He said he would feel comfortable eating anything out of a can as long as the seal wasn’t broken. He said as long as the lid hasn’t popped up (which indicates the seal has broken and air has gotten into the can), then it’s safe. So…is it safe to can this teriyaki sauce? The USDA would probably say no, all our friends on the other side of the ocean would say yes. The choice is yours! :)

  22. C Mathas

    wrote on

    I think I’m going to go for it. If I’ve convinced anyone else to do so, remember to substitute Clear-Jel for the cornstarch. I’ll let you know how the canning worked…

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Sounds good, CMathas, and thanks for the tip.

  23. wrote on

    How many times can I say WOW! I made this last minute – the teriyaki sauce I picked up at the local store just didn’t look right (consistency of water) so I made this. I substituted brown rice syrup for honey (I’m waiting for my local honey share) and it turned out great! Thank you! I am trying to make as many things as I can from scratch, easily and quickly, so I know what goes into it, and this is going to get made again and again and again.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Fantastic, Snowy, I’m so happy you enjoyed this Teriyaki Sauce! Thanks for the feedback and I hope you’ll visit often and try some more recipes. Best, Kimberly

  24. Matt

    wrote on

    I was just wondering if you had ever attempted a hoisin sauce?
    thanks

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      So funny you ask that, Matt. Yes, it’s been on my mind lately and I’m gearing up to do some experimenting. I’ll be posting a recipe for it once I’ve got the “code cracked” :)

      • Matt

        wrote on

        Fantastic. Looking forward to it.

        • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

          wrote on

          Hopefully coming soon, Matt!

  25. Mitzi Robinson

    wrote on

    Made this for dinner tonight, but I quadrupled it. I’m freezing three 1-cup containers. Hopefully it thaws nicely! I figure if they freeze sauce cubes for those Asian meals-in-a-bag, I can freeze this too and thaw it the day of. I’ll update when we eat the frozen sauce.

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      I’ve never tried freezing it, Mitzi, and am curious to hear how it turns out!

  26. Laiba

    wrote on

    is there a non alcoholic substitute for mirin?

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Hi Laiba, since mirin is slightly acidic you can use a very mild vinegar instead, such as rice wine vinegar or white wine vinegar. Use half the amount of vinegar, taste it, and you can add a little more if you like.

  27. Julia

    wrote on

    Just made this….awesome! So yum I kept licking the spoon lol. Didn’t have any sesame though but non the less it still tasted awesome! :) p.s Laiba – cooking burns off any alcohol :)

    • Kimberly @ The Daring Gourmet

      wrote on

      Awesome, Julia, thank you! Now, as good as you think it was without the sesame oil, add it next time and you’ll love it even more. Thanks so much for your feedback! Best, Kimberly

Trackbacks

  1. […] I knew my husband needed at least some seasoning in his food, so I whipped up a tasty cup of homemade teriyaki sauce and used a couple of tablespoonfuls to season the meat balls and vegetables. Leftovers stay good in […]

Leave a Reply